bf skinner

0 Comments

bf skinner

Another way to prevent getting this page in the future is to use Privacy Pass. You may need to download version 2.0 now from the Chrome Web Store.
If you are on a personal connection, like at home, you can run an anti-virus scan on your device to make sure it is not infected with malware.

Once upon a time in the land of Psi there lived a very famous baker named Fred. Fred the baker was known from far and wide as the very best baker in the land. His skill at baking was unmatched for he could produce loaves of any size or shape — long and thin bread sticks, round Kaiser rolls, crescent-shaped croissants, twisted oval loaves, and so on. His famous motto was: “Give me the unkneaded dough and in time I can produce any kind of loaf of bread desired.” Fred called this process ‘shaping’.
This is a slightly revised version of a paper read to the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association Convention in Lansing, Michigan, on October 27, 1972. I am indebted to Gene D’Amour, John Hebert, Pat McKee and Bernie Rollin for reading and commenting on an earlier draft of this paper.

Dept. of Psychology, Harvard University, 33 Kirkland St., William James Hall, Cambridge, Mass. 02138.Search for more papers by this author
Dept. of Psychology, Harvard University, 33 Kirkland St., William James Hall, Cambridge, Mass. 02138.Search for more papers by this author

The behaviorism that cognitive scientists attack is a caricature, drawn primarily from the more polemical writings of J. B. Watson and B. F. Skinner. In this brief commentary, I discuss the fact that these writings, and especially Skinner’s offered the neocognitivists such a polar difference from their own position, that it was easier to ignore the distinction between behaviorism and neobehaviorism than to recognize it. I point out that there are factors in Skinner’s intellectual history that may account for the emergence of his more radical behaviorism out of what was essentially his own theoretical, neobehavioristic approach to the study of conditioning and learning.
Previous article in issue
Next article in issue

References:

http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-94-010-2140-1_6
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1901/jeab.1966.9-213
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/000579169290002Z
http://www.retroreport.org/education/video/psychology-behaviorism-b.f.-skinner-and-social-media/