Reflections

I have been reflecting about my last 2 months of backpacking. What stands out the most for me is that I actually did it, I fulfilled a dream.

Greg on the Trail

Greg on the Trail

The incredible adventure of it all accentuated by my adopted carefree approach filled in any remaining confidence gaps that I may have had. Backpacking, especially on the Pacific Crest Trail can be extremely difficult. You do ask yourself, why am I doing this, but then you find yourself in some of the most amazingly beautiful secluded places on earth and realize how fortunate you are. That realization is highlighted a bit more when you are 61 years old with 2 artificial hips. Overall, I backpacked over 280 miles with over 50K of vertical. The trip reports for the various segments are presented in my blog: http://higheredtechtalk.org which I now refer to as Higher Elevation Tech Talk.

My transition from being a Chief Information Officer, CIO, at major STEM research university in the middle of America played out quickly and a bit unexpectedly. Contributing factors included my frustration with university system leadership and policy, loosening of family regional ties due to the passing of parents and a desire to return to the stronger ties that still existed in the Northwest. Many of my friends and peers must have wondered how could I walk away from such a solid job before heading off into the unknown. The fact I had no reservations about the move surprised me the most. My wife, getting a job in Oregon, definitely helped ease the worry; but I resigned before she started looking for a job. We have never shied away from adventure, in fact this was move 25 in our 38 years of marriage. I look at this adventure as an investment in myself with the backpacking experiences as an investment in memories for retirement. As my wife told me, if you don’t pursue this dream now, maybe later you won’t be able to.

I am now back to work as a consultant tackling the typical technology challenges I used to deal with as a CIO. I have no idea where the path now leads, however, there are plenty of options for someone who can get things done. I mentioned filling in some confidence gaps, I’m not exactly sure what those gaps were, but I do know what I accomplished during this backpacking adventure has provided a sense of ultimate completion.

When I was at Missouri S&T my employees referred to me as the snowplow, meaning I cleared the way for them to be successful. I guess I did a bit of plowing to make this backpacking adventure turn out as well as it did. First, I had to “Just Do It” which was easy for me. I didn’t have all the answers but I knew that I could quickly figure it out, like adapting to a flexible trail schedule, optimizing my equipment and understanding my body’s physical limits. Then I was able to optimize the experience for maximum enjoyment return. So when a trail is closed choose another, or if conditions are deteriorating then change your plan. This is the same in business, you react to the available data, but you have to react. At the management level, choosing a trip with no forest fire closure is a fairly easy choice, but on the trail, implementing decisions based on path, distance and weather minimizes risk. Success comes from your efficiency in making the best decision at the right time.

Owen Point Section of Map

Owen Point Section of Map

I think back to the end of my recently completed 75K backpacking segment, the West Coast Trail on Vancouver Island, BC. My plan was to camp on the beach near Owen Point to setup for the next morning passage at low tide below 6 feet. Well I never found a place to camp and ended up at Owen Point late in the afternoon.  I had a small window of opportunity to get through, low tide was only 5.2 feet at 4:40 pm.

Boulder Beach

Beach Boulders to Navigate

This was a critical decision point, I had already hiked 14K and my body was tired, continuing on committed me to the navigation of two kilometers of a beach piled high with massive boulders to get to Thrasher Cove. Also, I had heard that a storm was coming so I did want to make sure I could end the trip the following day. My decision was to get past Owen Point then and deal with the boulders. Getting past Owen Point even at low tide was difficult and I slipped into the ocean soaking my boots but I saved my backpack. Now the boulders in wet boots. That 2K stretch of beach turned out to be one of the most physically strenuous efforts I have ever put myself through. I loved it, the adrenaline kicked in with my focus entirely on the goal of reaching Thrasher Cove which I accomplished in time to secure a campsite that I correctly calculated to be on ground above high tide.

Accomplishment is a powerful reward, but it only comes from your willingness to tackle a challenge. It is the same in your professional career, and what I have always sought out. I’m sure I will take on a few more professional challenges but I will also continue to balance life with wilderness challenges to ensure the fulfillment of more dreams.

The Adventure Continues

The West Coast Trail – Vancouver Island, BC

I finished off my 2 month backpacking adventure by choosing to leave the hot, dry, smokey Pacific Crest Trail to take on the infamous West Coast Trail on Vancouver Island, BC.

Start of WCT at Pachena Bay

Start of WCT at Pachena Bay

This was totally a spur of the moment decision to go for this unique backpacking destination. I only knew about this trail because my wife found it listed in a top backpacking destinations of the world listing in response to my frustrations with the PCT conditions. Most who take on this trip will get their permits early in the year and plan for months. I had a day to replace my REI tent and schedule a few important things like ferry and bus reservations. I actually got the date wrong for the ferry but all worked out without a hitch, I even stayed at the Ocean Island backpackers hostel in Victoria, BC, the night before. On August 21st I road the 5+ hour bumpy bus ride to Pachena Bay Trailhead and got the last walk on permit available. This was just meant to happen with the added bonus of perfect weather.

After a required orientation session put on by the Canadian Parks Service I set out via the beach trailhead for a 12K destination of the Michigan Creek Campsite.

Michigan Creek Campsite

Michigan Creek Campsite

You are provided an excellent waterproof trail map which I quickly realized steered you to designated camping areas which typically had a bear vault for food and a composting outhouse. I went along with this option the first night but there after I tried to camp by myself on the beach whenever possible. I wasn’t being anti-social, I just am not used to that type of control. The West Coast Trail is much more geared to groups which is really important for the motivation and teamwork needed to complete the trail successfully. I did get to know many, typically Canadians and Europeans who were on the same trail schedule as I was. The West Coast Trail is considered an accomplishment of a lifetime for the many casual backpackers who attempt it. As a solo older hiker I was a bit of an anomaly.

The first day’s 12K segment was relatively easy in comparison to the previous PCT segments I had been on. But it was a different kind of difficult in that the trail presented so many situations of risk. I slipped, stumbled and fell far more times on this trail then all of my miles on mountain trails.

Fear Of Heights was Not an Option

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

You had to overcome any fear of heights that you might have, ladders, log bridges, pulley cable cars and boulder hopping.

Mud and Roots

Mud and Roots

I did have to use my first aid kit a few times. I mentioned slippery, mud is a big part of the trail, however, I again benefitted from the period of dry weather, so I believe the typical muddy root infested climbs were tame compared to how they might have been in a normal wet environment. I never had to use my gaiters.

Sea Lions with Whale spotting

Sea Lions with Whale spotting

Wild life on the trail consisted mostly of sea life. There were a couple a great Sea Lion viewing sites and you saw whales every day. Also lots of sea gulls and on the trail a fair number of small snakes. I was a bit disappointed that I did not get to experience a bear sighting, I intentionally hiked on the trail as quietly as possible, however, many of the hikers had bells on their packs.

If you have ever enjoyed coastal beauty you can relate to what became the norm for me on the this trail. Hundreds of photo worthy views of spectacular coastline. This would have been the trip for a better camera, however, you would probably break it in one of your falls.

Typical Coastline Views

My second night I searched for a private beach campsite which I found just past the Klanawa River.

You are advised not to camp outside of the designated camp areas, but the chance to camp on a secluded beach with a fire was worth ignoring the advice. I did hang my food from a tree not so much for fear of bears but in case I was questioned about camping alone on the beach.

I think that night alone on a wilderness beach with the fire, sunset and moon was one of the most amazing experiences I have ever had.

The third day required a long stretch of trail to just get to the next campsite option. Since I camped a few kilometers prior to the popular Tsusiat Falls, my day was even longer.

Fresh Salmon Lunch

Fresh Salmon Lunch

The reward though was a fish or crab lunch at the Nitinat Narrows. The native Indians provide a ferry service which conveniently takes you to their outdoor cafe on the water for a selection of Halibut, Salmon or Crab. Oh yes, and beer.

New Boardwalk

New Boardwalk

I opted for the Salmon but only had one beer since I still had 10K to hike to the Cribs Creek campsites. Thankfully that 10K stretch included a lot of boardwalk which you came to highly appreciate.

I was halfway done with the trail but you are fore warned that the northern segment is easier then the southern which was still ahead of me.

Trail Kilometers

Trail Kilometers

The trail did provide a nice feature of Kilometer markers. Typically you could do 3K per hour on good trail but only 1K on the difficult sections.

Colorful Mushrooms

Colorful Mushrooms

There were not many flowers on the trail, however, they would have been absorbed by the overabundance of vegetation. There were some interesting mushrooms though.

Relaxing at Chez Monique's

Relaxing at Chez Monique’s

The following day presented another cafe option known as Chez Monique’, a burger tent on the beach. This was too good to be true, a great burger with beer. Well since I put in such a long day prior and I was not on a strict schedule I decided to camp nearby and take the afternoon off with a burger and a number of tallboy brews. My photo shows that I also tempered the beer with some Pepsi. It was a fascinating day of conversations. The guy in the photo with the red shirt was giving a presentation in Vancouver on the Functional programming language GHCJS Haskell. And Monique was an assembly language programmer back in the fifties.

I was able to stumble back to my tent for a really good night’s sleep.

I spent the next night at Walbran Creek with about 40 others. I decided to be social and it was good. I did help a young lady with a foot blister problem understand that moleskin is intended to replace or cover your skin. She was putting it on at night and taking it off to hike??? Walbran did offer the nicest swimming hole but it had accumulated a bit too much seagull droppings for me.

The next day’s trail along the beach offered some of the most beautiful views yet.

My goal for the next day was to seek out another private beach campsite and I had hopes for an option before I got to Owen Point which requires a very low tide to navigate through the caves. Low tide was early in the morning so I hoped to be close to hit it the next day.

Beach Before Owen Point

Beach Before Owen Point

Well I entered the beach trail a few kilometers before Owen Pt. but could not find a suitable campsite.

Owen Point Section of Map

Owen Point Section of Map

So I ended up at Owen Point around 4:30 pm which was close to low tide, plus there were others who had been waiting there for the tide to recede. At this point I had to get past the caves but that meant I would have to navigate the dreaded boulder field for the next 3K to get to the Thrasher Campsite. I made it around Owen Point but not without partially falling into the ocean and getting my boots soaked.

I did save my backpack by giving up some skin off my elbows.

Boulder Beach

Boulder Beach

I mentioned the boulder field, Wow, navigating this section of beach over massive boulders at the end of a tiring day may be one of my most impressive physical accomplishments. I actually traversed them rather quickly, maybe I was just amazed that I was doing such a crazy thing. All I remember is that when in doubt about the path take the high road. Sometimes you ended up climbing over trees and boulders 2 stories high. Jumping down to boulders with a backpack did take a toll on my thighs, but I recovered quickly.

Once I got to Thrasher beach campsite I was faced with a crowded selection of real estate.

Thrasher Campsite

Thrasher Campsite

Prime locations were on high ground since we were expecting a higher than normal tide to hit around 11:00 pm. I chose a spot on on a level that did present some risk, but I had large trees that would protect me from waves. As it turned out most everyone stayed up to make sure that we did not get washed away. All part of the adventure.

Sunrise over Port San Juan

Sunrise over Port San Juan

The next morning brought a beautiful sunrise and less dew then typical so all was set for the final hike out to Port Renfrew. The last section was only 5K but it was a tough go with many root climbs, ladders and mud. I was excited to complete the trail but also sad for it to be over. The entire week I was blessed with perfect weather. Those starting the trail that day, August 27th, were in for many days of heavy rain.

Port Renfrew

Port Renfrew

I opted for a quick shower at the campground before going into Port Renfrew where I had halibut fish and chips. Excellent.

Dungeness Crab Lunch

Dungeness Crab Lunch

The bus got me back to Victoria by 8:00 pm, I got a hotel, then enjoyed some sight seeing in Victoria the next morning with a lunch of Dungeness Crab at Fisherman’s Wharf before catching the ferry back to the U.S.

What an amazing couple of months of backpacking and what a fantastic finish with the West Coast Trail, Hike of a Lifetime.

Stevens Pass to Snoqualmie Pass

Stevens Pass Ski Area

Stevens Pass Ski Area

I backpacked the Stevens Pass to Snoqualmie Pass, PCT Washington Segment J from Aug. 8-16, 2015. It is 71 miles and over 18,000 vertical. This trip on the heals of my Spider Gap Buck Creek loop was challenging in many ways, most of which was related to heat, lack of water, lots of vertical and smokey conditions. Overall though it is a very dramatic PCT segment complete with very rugged and beautiful terrain.

Campsite in Berries

Campsite in Berries

Starting off at the Stevens Pass Ski area was kind of cool thinking about how I might ski those runs that I was hiking. I was also treated to an abundance of huckleberry and blueberries for the first couple of days.

Mig Lake

Mig Lake

My second day I had my sights set for a campsite on top of a mountain but along the way I passed many lakes of which I think the most beautiful was Mig Lake.

Trap Lake

Trap Lake

At my mountain top campsite at PCT 2450 which was after a typical 3000 ft vertical climb day I had Trap Lake behind me and a beautiful sunset waiting ahead of me. One of the best campsites I have chosen.

Sunset from Campsite

Sunset from Mountain Top Campsite

The following day I planned on camping at Deception Lake, however,

Jets over the Wilderness

Jets over the Wilderness

I was not that impressed with the options and I knew it would end up being crowed with the many through hikers now hitting this part of Washington. I pressed on and found a great campsite just south of Deception Creek at PCT 2442. The photo showing the jet exhaust trail represents the many jets that you hear flying over this area out of Seattle. You never see the military jets which fly lower and louder.

Cathedral Rock

Cathedral Rock

The next day I climbed past the Cathedral Rock area but overall I took it easy and ended up at Deep Lake which offered a great site for a swim. Deep Lake still had water flow but it was low and the lake was warming up.

Deep Lake

Deep Lake

I knew that I had a tough high vertical day coming up so I also took it a bit easy the following day in preparation to climb over Escondido Pass. I knew that water was going to be an issue and when I realized that my Camelbak bladder had leaked I was a bit concerned.

Smoke Over Lake Waptus

Smoke Over Lake Waptus

I did find a trickle of a stream where I filled up a Nalgene liter but I would need more. This was a long and exposed segment that turned out to be on one of the hottest days along with a lot of smoke sneaking into the area from the Washington forest fires.

Escondido Pass

Escondido Pass

There are a couple of dead lakes on top but who wants to drink warm water. It turned out that I did not have enough water or energy which made for a very difficult day. Boy was I happy when I finally got to a cool stream over near Lemah Meadows. I setup camp as it was getting dark and I collapsed for a night’s sleep to recharge. I did experience an interesting event that night as I believe a large buck must have been startled by my tent which was fairly near the trail. This was at 1:30 am and this buck sounded like he raised up and pounded his hooves 3times right next to my tent. Nothing I could do but just lay there.

I took it easy the next day in preparation for more climbing.

Weather Changing

Weather Changing

My plan was to camp near the Park Lakes area which turned out to be as far as I could get before the rain set in.

Campsite during Storm

Campsite during Storm

In all of my backpacking I have been extremely fortunate with respect to weather, rarely have I endured a serious rain. Well that all changed with a night of wind and rain which was sorely needed by the draught stricken mountains. I did choose a good campsite next to a lake on top of ground shrubs which made for good drainage for the night long rain. The video gives you an idea of how pleasant the night long rain was.

Park Lakes Area

Park Lakes Area

The following day turned out to be a lot tougher then I expected, lots of up and downs, but the misty weather made for excellent hiking conditions.

Above Alaska Lake

Above Alaska Lake

This is very scenic terrain and doing it in the clouds made for a unique day. Again my day stretched to the end of my energy just in time to make camp at Ridge Lake, just before it started raining again.

Hiking in the Clouds

Hiking in the Clouds

Not so bad, just persistent. But this was my last night on the PCT since Snoqualmie Pass was over the next pass. Of course the sun came out just as I got on the trail. It would have been nice to have had the sun to dry some things out before heading out.

After the Storms

After the Storms

However, the rain brought crystal clear air for some of the most beautiful terrain left on the segment. This is a very popular day hike segment for the Seattle folks so I passed hundreds of them as I headed down to Snoqualmie Pass.

Then you see Mt. Rainier and you can get cell service. This all translated into a wonderful finish to this PCT segment. After getting my resupply at the Chevron Station and showering I enjoyed a few craft beers from the Dru Bru Brewery.

Spider Gap Buck Creek Loop

I am sorry for being a bit late on posting about our Spider Gap Buck Creek Loop trip, Aug 1-6. As expected this loop was amazing and lived up to our high expectations.

Spider Gap from Spider Meadow

Spider Gap from Spider Meadow

Every year I do a loop like this with friends and when we have asked other backpackers what they believe to be the best loop, Spider Gap Buck Creek tends to be the winner. And it is truly an awesome loop complete with incredible vistas, challenging climbs and unique topography.

We decided to take the counter clockwise route beginning with the Spider Meadow Phelps Creek trail. The meadow was beautiful but it was obvious that we had missed the high flower point by a few weeks.

Spider Gap Snow Field

Spider Gap Snow Field

Taking it easy the first day we planned for the Spider Gap climb which is broken into an initial 1000 ft climb on a fairly rugged rock trail and then another 1000 ft climb on up the snow field. The reward at the top was worth the climb.

Coming over Spider Gap

Coming over Spider Gap

The view into the Lyman Lakes Valley and Glacier was highlighted by rugged terrain which turned out to offer up a bit of a scare to us. We made the mistake of assuming the trail to the east would eventually wind down to the valley. Wrong, so I advised that we backtrack and go down the snow field. Unfortunately, Bob, who hates to backtrack decided to take the short cut down the mountain slope. This was not communicated well and we ended up getting separated from Bob.

Camp site at Lyman Lakes

Camp site at Lyman Lakes

The outcome of this turned into a nervous search for Bob who did eventually turn up to relieve our fears after he had a bit of a hair raising decent down the side of the mountain ending up further down the valley. Our concern stemmed from the dangerous loose rock navigation that could easily result in a slid or a fall. But all was well and we settled in between the Lyman Lakes.

Old Backpackers

Old Backpackers

The following day took us over Cloudy Pass which lived up to its name. This is also about the time we began enjoying an over abundance of blueberries and huckleberries. Again we kept losing Bob because he couldn’t resist stopping and eating the berries.

First View of PCT Fire Aug. 3

First View of PCT Fire Aug. 3

This is when we first saw the fires which have wreaked havoc with the PCT Trail closure. At this time the big fires over at Lake Chelan had not blown up yet. As we climbed over the pass we got to speak with many of the local Whistle Pig population.

Spider Gap and Lyman Lakes

Spider Gap and Lyman Lakes

This was also when we discovered that the detour to Stehekin was no longer an option for the PCT’ers. We went about half way to Image Lake and turned around figuring that the weather was not going to present us with enough reward. After talking to others who went over I think it was the right decision.

Fortrace Mountain

Fortrace Mountain

We camped across from Fortress Mountain. This was the Suiattle Pass Junction area where the PCT closure was spelled out.

PCT Closure Aug. 4th

PCT Closure Aug. 4th

We continued on with our loop up to Buck Creek Pass knowing that we would have time for a side hike. We setup camp at the top of the pass while the weather still looked good and we decided to do the Liberty Cap trail.

Will Clouds Lift off Glacier Peak

Will Clouds Lift off Glacier Peak

Looking back to Suiattle Pass

Looking back to Suiattle Pass

I highly recommend this route which offers fabulous views of Glacier Peak.

Liberty Cap

Liberty Cap

Well the weather started to change once we got up on Liberty Cap which caused us some concern but also offered beauty in the cloud formations.

Storm Approaching Glacier Peak

Storm Approaching Glacier Peak

We got back to camp just in time to avoid the rain.

Buck Ridge

Buck Ridge

The next morning it was still miserable on the pass but we could see that there was sun in the valley on our route back to the Trinity Trailhead. The annual backpacking loop trip with friends was again a great success, however, this year I was set to continue on for a few more weeks.

End of the Trail

End of the Trail

My original plan was to get my resupply and go from Stevens Pass to Canada, however, the fires forced a change to that strategy. So I decided to go from Stevens Pass to Snoqualmie Pass for my next segment.

Fires Force Reroute of My PCT Backpacking

Heading South from Stevens Pass

Heading South from Stevens Pass

The Spider Gap Buck Creek Loop backpacking trip was awesome.

The forest fires around Glacier Peak increased in number and size to prevent me from backpacking from Stevens Pass to Stehekim, so I have decided to go south from Stevens Pass instead. Starting Saturday August 8th I will head south from Stevens Pass to resupply at Snoqualmie Pass on I90. I will then go on to White Pass for a total of

I will provide trip report blog post when I return at the end of August.

The Stevens Pass to Snoqualmie segment was awesome and challenging. Lot’s of vertical plus some heat and rain. The view of Mt. Rainier was a welcome on a beautiful Sunday.

Mt. Rainier heading into Snoqualmie Pass

Mt. Rainier heading into Snoqualmie Pass

Oregon Central Coast

Proposal Rock

Proposal Rock in Neskowin, OR

I have been off the trail for 2 weeks and it seems like an eternity. I’m not sure if I just miss the wilderness or I am just overly pumped for the upcoming longer commitment. It was insightful to go through the planning steps for coordinating a month on the trail and sending off resupply boxes. I have an even greater respect for the PCT through hikers who figure this out for many months. But I am ready to go. The Spider Gap Buck Creek Loop with friends will be fabulous and then on to Canada on the PCT. Thankfully it appears the forest fires are under control.

North Neskowin Beach

North Neskowin Beach

In preparation for this next backpacking commitment I have been fortunate to spend about a week down at our townhouse in Neskowin. We have a 1/12 fractional share which is priceless (there may be a share for sale) The weather has been fabulous and the hiking opportunities around Neskowin are as good as it gets for the Oregon Coast. Let me give you a glimpse of my hiking preparation over the last 3 or 4 days.

View South from Cascade Head

View South from Cascade Head

Hiking the beach is always great exercise by way of distance and solitude. Rarely are there any other humans once you get a mile or so north of Neskowin. Hiking on Cascade Head should always be done either from above or below.

View from Cape Foulweather

View from Cape Foulweather

My daughter motivated me to go for a longer hike so we opted for the trails behind Cape Pepetua scenic coastline. On the drive down we needed to stop at Cape Foulweather because the view is awesome. The Cape Perpetua coastline is considered the most beautiful in America and the hiking trails in the Siuslaw National Forest offer exposure to impressive old growth forests.

The Thumb

The Thumb

The unexpected hiking delight turned out to be the Thumb Trail which is a little known trail that starts at the end of Roads End in Lincoln City. A short hike with some serious technical climb to the Thumb but the view is second to none on the coast.

Cascade Head from Thumb

Cascade Head from Thumb

This discovery was extra special since it gave me a view of Cascade Head from the South.

Lincoln City from Thumb

Lincoln City from Thumb

This area is not really setup for serious traffic so please take care of this gem. The top of the Thumb is a bit dangerous especially with strong winds, it drops off on 3 sides.

Is this too good to be true?

August Backpacking Schedule

My backpacking schedule for August has been confirmed. August 1-7 I am doing Spider Gap Buck Creek Loop near Glacier Peak just Southeast of the PCT providing a great 44 mile loop rated difficult. I will do the loop with friends; Bob and Jeff. Backpacker GregThen I will get a ride over to Bellingham, WA, to visit friend John to resupply and prepare for my final solo PCT segment.

August 8th or 9th I will be dropped off at the PCT on Stevens Pass where I will head north to Manning Park Canada, about 200 miles. I will resupply in Stehekin, WA, which is a resort lodge at the North end of Lake Chelan. There are no communications (Phone, Internet) in Stehekin, so I believe I will be off the grid until I get to Canada. I’ll send a post card from Stehekin to let folks know my progress.

Dusk Proposal Rock

Dusk Proposal Rock

I should get back home by the end of August so that I can begin work with Willamette View. So what a great August it should be, about 250 miles of the most beautiful wilderness in America. Can’t wait to be on the trail again.

I will be mentally preparing for this adventure next week on the coast in Neskowin.

Timberline to Cascade Locks

My second Oregon PCT segment was excellent, the weather was what you would expect and the scenery was as good as it gets.

Abby

Abby

Unfortunately when it ended and I returned to the cellular world at the Eagle Creek Trailhead I found out that my beloved old backpacking canine companion, Abby, had died the night before. It was good that I had another 2.5 miles before I got to Cascade Locks, I needed the time to shed tears and reflect on our years together. I am so glad that we got to travel back to Oregon together. Australian Shepherds are incredible dogs and Abby was one of the best.

Leaving TimberlineBack to the Hood to Gorge review. My wife and I spent the night before I departed at Timberline Lodge. Weather was perfect as were the IPAs we consumed in the adirondack chairs observing Mt. Hood. We could see Mt. Jefferson to the South initially but the view faded away into a smoky haze from the fires in southern Oregon.

Early Views of Hood

Early Views of Hood

I departed on July 9th in beautiful weather with no deadlines, just a destination. The PCT from Timberline takes you into the Paradise Park area which is all about majestic views of Mt. Hood. You feel very small underneath the mountain. An afternoon thunder storm brought needed moisture but also motivated me to seek a campsite. A heavy fog moved in which essentially equated to rain all night long. Paradise ParkThe following day offered more amazing Paradise Park views. This is fairly rugged trail that skirts the many snow melt streams from Hood. The main goal was to have a relaxing lunch at Ramona Falls, however, crossing the headwaters of the Sandy river to get there always presents a challenge.

Sandy Crossing

Sandy Crossing

So when I came out of the forest to greet the Sandy it was obvious that I was not crossing that high volume stream at this PCT designated trail point. When looking for a crossing you head upstream and look for perfectly positioned rocks or hopefully a log assisted crossing.

Mt. Hood from Sandy

Mt. Hood from Sandy

I found the log/stick crossing that had been thrown together, and although it was a bit scary it turned out to be more then adequate. The reward for the challenging stream crossing is a glorious view of Mt. Hood.

Ramona Falls

Ramona Falls

Then on to the ultimate reward of Ramona Falls and I was not disappointed. The sunlight through the trees creates unique highlights of this cascading waterfall.

I needed to put in a few more miles so taking the PCT Ramona Falls alternate trail to the Muddy Fork Junction was a perfect climax to my second day. Endurance CrossingHowever, crossing fast flowing stream on a couple of logs was interesting. But more interesting to watch were a couple of endurance runners cross the stream on foot.

The next day, Saturday, was a bit dreary weather wise, but that was OK since it kept down the day hiker population. It was a tough day for distance and vertical, 10 miles of 3000 ft up and about 1500 down. When I passed Lolo Pass I was thinking about putting a long sleeve shirt on which made me wonder about the 4 teenagers who were heading up to Bald Mtn. in shorts and tank tops.

Throne to Hood

Mt. Hood and Lost Lake from Buck Peak

Sunday ushered in a lifting fog which made for an eerie beautiful trail. The body felt good as I was knocking off more vertical before the inevitable drop. I had passed Devil’s Pulpit and Preachers Peak so I was in the mood for a wilderness church setting. About 10:00 am I noticed a side trail which lead to Buck Peak. The trail was OK but narrow and overgrown enough to mean that condensation from the vegetation was going to be soaking. But I sensed its call and a half mile up I was rewarded with His majestic throne’s view of Mt. Hood and Lost Lake. The church service was excellent.

Ripe Huckelberries

Ripe Huckelberries

The trail began the inevitable elevation decline to the gorge and with it came an abundance of ripe berries. I had a wonderful afternoon taking my time enjoying the spectacular view of the Eagle Creek canyon and eating plenty of ripe Huckleberries. After arriving at the Indian Springs abandoned campground I opted to continue on another 3 miles to Wahtum Lake. Definitely the right call as the lake campsite was beautiful and the trail there and then on to rejoin the Eagle Creek alternate PCT trail was a more gradual vertical decline complete with beautiful lush waterfall strewn scenery. Oh yes, and plenty of Thimbleberries, a tasty relative of the raspberry.

Tunnel Falls

Tunnel Falls

I knew I was in for a treat from the Eagle Creek canyon trail but little did I know how amazing it would be. My daughter and I hiked up this trail about 10 years ago but stopped short of the really great landmarks.  Tunnel CloseSo the ultimate goal is Tunnel Falls, which totally lives up to the hype. Actually the entire Eagle Creek Trail is awesome with many serious waterfalls, good swimming holes, precarious cliff carved trail and great campsites. But Tunnel Falls, Wow.

I knew that my trip would end the next day so I kept looking for the ultimate campsite, but I was getting tired.

Last Night Campsite

Last Night Campsite

Thankfully I kept seeking a better site and ended up with a primo campsite just below 4-Mile Bridge next to this 30+ foot waterfall that I don’t even know the name. But it made for a perfect last night on the trail where I was spared the heartbreak of knowing what was happening at the time with my dog, Abby.

Bridge of The Gods

Bridge of The Gods

The final day took me past High Bridge and Punchbowl Falls, plus greeting about a hundred, mostly day hikers, many with the goal to make it the 6 miles to Tunnel Falls. After receiving the news about Abby I hiked the Columbia River Highway State Trail up to Cascade Locks which provides a very nice view of Bridge of The Gods over to Washington. My wife and daughter were at the PCT Trailhead park by the bridge waiting for me. It was a gorgeous day for a burger and beer as we mourned the loss of our family dog.

Backpacking Lessons Learned

My first segment on the PCT taught me a lot, but the most important was that you cannot beat the heat. My goal was Willamette Pass to McKenzie Pass, about 80 miles in 9 days. I aborted after 6 days and about 50 miles after 2 days of 90+ degree heat with thunderstorm humidity did me in. The other lesson taken away was to keep your destination schedule open, since you never know what will affect that schedule.

OK, now for a quick update on what I did accomplish. Remember, I am 61 years old, healthy, but not really in great shape and I have been living at low altitude.

First Campsite Overlooking Rosary Lakes

First Campsite Overlooking Rosary Lakes

I started off in the afternoon figuring I just needed to get a few miles under my belt to loosen up. I ended up going 5 miles and climbing 1200 vertical to end up at a fabulous overlook campsite. I felt great and was so pumped to be transitioning into this new wilderness mindset.

Willamette Pass Ski Cabin

Winter Ski Cabin

The second day I enjoyed the comfort of a really nice winter ski cabin to escape the mosquitos and reorganize a bit. I determined that I would camp at the top of the next climb which meant I had to pack more water which I secured at Bobby Lake. I put in 9 miles and more good vertical and the body was responding well. Also to my surprise I had cellular service (maybe from Waldo Lake), although sporadic, but it did allow me to let the world know I was doing OK.

Carlton Lake

Carlton Lake

Mosquito Survival Net

Mosquito Survival Net

The third day felt good, I get up early to take advantage of early morning coolness which allows you to wear longs sleeves to combat the mosquitos, but that is nothing new, just inconvenient.

Trail Maintenance Team

Trail Maintenance Team

I knocked off a number of miles and stopped at Carlton Lake to filter water and cleanup a bit. The mosquitos were getting worse and the breeze off the lake was a a welcome relief.

I was feeling good so a set a goal of another 9 mile day to get to Taylor Lake. Along the way I thanked a trail maintenance team for the work they do and travelled through maybe a 10 year old fire area.

Fire Burn Area

Fire Burn Area

Peaceful Taylor Lake

Peaceful Taylor Lake

I got to my campsite early afternoon and took advantage of relaxing by Taylor Lake enjoying the mosquito less breeze. This was the first time I realized I had pushed my body to about max, but I could tell that I was able to refresh it with rest.

Around dinner time I was joined by a couple of PCT through hikers, trail names: Ranger and Bubba Gump, which made for good conversation as I compared my PCT adventure to theirs. They may have been one of the first through hikers to reach this far north, however, they skipped the Sierras to avoid the late winter storm.

PCT Through Hikers

Ranger and Bubba Gump

They did plan to return to do the JMT.

Next day I watched the young buck through hikers leave me in the dust I again felt strong and very satisfied with how my body was responding. However, the temperature was rising and all was about to change. I pushed myself this day for 10 miles and ended up at a campsite totally depleted of energy as the heat was taking a toll on me that I still believed I could plow through. That night we had a thunderstorm which did little to reduce the temperature but it did raise the humidity. The overcast morning made for a warmer and more intense mosquito start to the day. After my initial few miles of enthusiastic trekking my body started rebelling. I was sweating a lot which I think I was replenishing with liquids, but the heat toll was greater then that. I had hoped to put in 12 miles and make it to Elk Lake Resort. However, as my body began to fail, symptoms of heat exhaustion setting in, I made the decision to stop at Dumbbell lake only half way but my only good camp option.

Therma Rest Float

Therma Rest Float

Anyways, wisdom was setting in and I knew I had to back off due to the heat and this lake looked ideal for the swimming potential. So I made camp before noon and focused the afternoon on body recovery. Floating around the lake on my Therma Rest Pad provided a wonderful way to cool down and great relaxation. However, I was now challenged to make my designated destination pickup at Lava Lake Trailhead. Unfortunately, it was still hot and more storm clouds added to the humidity.

The only remaining option which would allow me to complete the planned segment would be to put in 10 miles and summit Koosah Mountain with a difficult 1200 vertical or bailout with a 6 mile mostly downhill trail to Elk Lake Resort.

End of my Trail

End of my Trail

Well about 4 miles into the effort it was obvious that heat exhaustion was not going to allow me to accomplish the needed goal so Elk Lake it was.

Actually aborting in this way made for a fairly interesting adventure in figuring out how to get home. I hitchhiked from Elk Lake, something I have not done for 40 years. The couple that gave me a ride dropped me off at the Cascade Lake Brewery in Bend, OR. I was able to connect with an old GEOAID colleague who gave me a bed for the night. Then I took a bus shuttle to Gresham, OR, where I caught the MAX light rail train to Hillsboro. All in all, it was a wonderful first phase of the adventure. Backpacking is tough, but the rewards of experiencing God’s earthly beauty justify the effort. I’m ready to hit the trail again in a week after this heat wave subsides.

Backpacking Tomorrow – Yes

The backpack is loaded and I am ready to go. Tomorrow I will kickoff my first segment at Willamette Pass on highway 58 just East of Eugene, OR, where I will head north on the Pacific Crest Trail for 75 miles to McKenzie Pass. This is actually Halfmile’s Oregon Section E Map, by the way, I’m excited to try out the Halfmile PCT iPhone GPS App. This segment will take me through the 3 Sisters Wilderness area and should be a good warmup. I am giving myself 8 days which should not be difficult even by not being in backpacking shape. This is a great trip with plenty of lakes, moderate vertical changes, some lava fields, lots of beautiful mountains and hopefully plenty of wildflowers with limited mosquitos.

My pack fully loaded including max water is 41 pounds. A little heavy but I know that I can cut out 3 or 4 pounds of water for the first half of the segment. I might need all of the water plus an additional water bag toward the end depending on the availability of stream water. The food weighs about 7 pounds and will only get lighter as it is consumed. Heat is going to be a concern. Temperatures on the trail will reach close to 90 on many of the days. The heat will allow me to use a lightweight sleeping bag and go light on cloths but hiking will need to be done early in the day with siestas for the afternoon.

I believe I have taken care of all the backpacking prep. REI was heavily utilized to provide me with the most efficient backpack and gear possible. Mentally I and totally psyched, I mean I can’t wait to immerse myself into the wilderness. My friends and family are concerned that I am going alone and they have pushed hard for me to consider a satellite phone or beacon. But no, I am not worried about this segment, by PCT backpacking challenge, this will be pretty easy. Sure I may injure myself but I will survive, there will be other hikers who will hear my whistle for help.

South Sister

Should be my campsite on Day 6 – South Sister

The greater challenge that I have transitioned through is mental acceptance that I am actually doing this. Thoughts of shouldn’t I be working or what about other professional opportunities have crept into my head, but I think I have them cleared away. Yes I am going to take a few days in-between the next segment to launch my consulting career with Willamette View, but everything has worked out to make me believe that I am truly supposed to be doing this. I do believe that there is some greater understanding that I will gain from it.

I don’t know what that might be but I can’t wait to reevaluate life after coming out of the wilderness in a few months. I know that what ever I will do, I will do it better for having this experience. I love that confidence that I know God has planted in me.

Where it all started

Yampa Valley

Yampa Valley

On my trip back to the Northwest an important stop for me is Steamboat Springs, CO. An old Indian legend of the Yampa was that one returns to live in the Yampa Valley 3 times. That legend was true for me. First as a Ski Bum living in Ski Time Square next to the Tugboat Saloon. I was a refugee from working at Snow Mountain Ranch and came to Steamboat with a job at the Holiday Inn in 1976. Of course this evolved after serving as a Presbyterian missionary working at a Chicano Day Care, “House of Neighborly Service” in Brighton, CO, during the summer of 76. Well the first stop in Steamboat ended when it did not snow that winter and they closed the mountain (soon there after snow making was installed).

Scientific Frontiers Grand Opening 1981

Computer Store Looks to Future

The second visit was really the beginning of the computer career. I was a chemist at a electric power plant in Gary, IN, making a lot of money in a strike situation. I had purchased an Apple II and was obsessed with it. So I called my college room mate, Jeff Troeger, who was just finishing up his MBA and Law degree at IU. I asked him if he wanted to start a computer store in Steamboat Springs, CO. He weighed his alternative of working at the family business in South Bend, IN or move to Steamboat. Jeff is still here in Steamboat.

My final move to Steamboat occurred in 1984 after leaving the Oil Shale, UniCal Parachute Creek Project, to work for at the time, ACZ Inc. By this time I was a legitimate computer guy who was hired to be the I head of IT for this mine engineering consulting company with a commercial environmental lab. Today I am staying with one of last remaining mine engineers from ACZ living in Steamboat, Jerry Nettleton.

Steamboat Springs

Steamboat Springs

Fish Creek Falls

Fish Creek Falls

My visit here has been fabulous. My dog Abby has regenerated her appetite and is loving the opportunity to get back to her normal 22 hours of sleep per day. My first day involved hitting all the memorable sites. Views above the town, Fish Creek Falls, and exploring the new micro breweries. I hooked up with Jeff and he invited me to take his favorite hike  on day 2 from his house up to the Thunderhead Lodge (top of gondola) on Mt. Werner. The hike was just what I needed to push the body for the upcoming PCT backpacking. 9.5 miles and 2200″ of vertical that hurt so good. Rainy day today but plan to seek out a few more old friends and do a little memorabilia shopping. On to Walla Walla, WA, tomorrow.

On the Road

I have been on the road for 5 days and Abby and I are adjusting to a relaxed flexible schedule. The drive across the plains was painless and a rather enjoyable way to begin the clearing of the head. Abby does not put her head down while traveling so long milage days take their toll on her, but she was a trooper. First stop in Monument, CO, allowed me to visit a great friend whom I have strong mountain man ties from an earlier life in NW Colorado.

View from 14,110 ft.

View from 14,110 ft.

I wanted to drive to the top of Pikes Peak but snow has not allowed that yet. So I did the tourist Cog Railway ride to the top. It was a beautiful day, 27 degrees at the top and extremely thin air for Missouri lungs. But that rush of cold air was exactly what my body needed to initiate the rebuild process.

Palmer Lake Reservoir

Palmer Lake Reservoir

So the next day I was off for a hike with Abby to test my legs and lungs as well as evaluate Abby’s 12+ year body. I was very pleased with my progress but Abby is not destined for anymore serious hiking. Abby doesn’t realize that her weak hips don’t work the way they used to.

Leaving Colorado Springs

Leaving Colorado Springs

The drive over to Vail by way of highway 24 out of Colorado Springs was majestic. The view of Pikes Peak, the many fourteeners around Buena Vista highlighted by the Collegiate Peaks and then enjoying a beer at the Silver Dollar Saloon in Leadville made for a great trip over to Vail. Sorry for the rushed post but I’ve promised many that I would share. Right now I’m recovering from a night in Vail and preparing for a round of golf at the Vail course.

Collegiate Peaks

Collegiate Peaks

NW Drought Backpacker Concerns

I am winding down my CIO career in Higher Ed so my thoughts wander more frequently to my next career of backpacking. It does appear that it will be a co-career with continued involvement with leading technological change in various industries, but backpacking is the immediate driver.

This brings me to the subject of this post which is the drought in the West. NWSnowpack0415smThe headlines have been informing us for a few years now how serious this drought is especially in California. But those headlines focus on identifiable concerns such as the supply of drinking water or irrigation of our nation’s richest agricultural region. This last year has been extremely significant for the drought due to the lack of snow pack in the Sierra or Cascade mountain ranges. Now this starts to get my attention because backpackers need water and water is heavy to carry.

I only plan on backpacking in Oregon and Washington this year which normally would not present a water concern, however, snowpack in the Cascades is at amazingly low. Washington’s governor just declared a drought emergency referencing snowpack at 16% of normal. From what I see the snowpack is better in northern Washington but the rest of the Northwest is in trouble. Not for drinking water but for some agricultural and higher threat for forest fires, but most important backpacking. My real concern is for Oregon which does not have as many lakes in the mountains as are in Washington. I hope to backpack through Crater lake in early July which normally would be a great challenge since it is rare to be able to get into Crater lake before July. Today there is no snow there, Crater Lake Webcam. The good news for that segment is that I can refill water in crater lake, but the challenge will be how much water I will need to carry to get to the next lake.

I want to do the PCT from Willamette pass to Mt. Jefferson which would take me through the Sisters. There are a few lakes but typically you count on snow melt streams. In fact I have backpacked in the east side of the Sisters knowing that the streams would only be running in late afternoon when the temperatures heated up. But many of those streams will be dry so I will be very grateful to trip reports from other hikers to help plan the water resupply strategy. I rely heavily on the many member reports on http://www.oregonhikers.org along with data from http://www.pcta.org and with high hopes for how Halfmile’s iPhone app will help guide me.

Washington will be better thanks to more lakes but it could mean missing exceptional flowers and it will cause different concerns about wildlife. My highlight segment for this year will be Spider Gap- Buck Creek Pass Loop in NC Washington. Good news is that the snow pack is much closer to normal in the north so our first week of August trip should be awesome.

Into the Wild

I have resigned as CIO of Missouri University of Science & Technology with an exit date planned for the end of May. I will be Returning to Oregon thanks to my wife’s new employment there. For the last few months I dabbled with other CIO opportunities but I’m not sure my heart was totally into it. I kept telling myself I would still consider trying to change higher education but I am really thankful that higher education is not quite ready for change. You see, I have the option to take some time off and make some dreams come true. For the second half of this year I hope to spend significant time backpacking the Pacific Crest Trail in Oregon and Washington.

I will use this blog to expand more upon my career transition and the new adventures awaiting me in the wilderness. I may very well return to Higher Education someday but for now it will be Higher Elevation.

Into the Wild

Teaching Real Business Skills

SAP University AlliancesI recently attended the SAP Academic Conference Americas 2015 in Tempe, AZ. I was invited to help present a session on how we had stimulated teaching and research with the purchase of our own HANA appliance at our university. I have mentioned this in previous posts but that was more about the strategic reasoning for why I invested in the leading “Big Data” solution. This conference was for the business professors who are committed to teaching SAP ERP and are excited about teaching the upcoming S4HANA Business Suite.

Yes, everyone was very impressed with how we have integrated HANA into our teaching curriculum and have shown how it can aid in scholarly research. But that success is due to our dedicated and talented professor, Bih-Ru Lea, who totally gets what our corporate partners want from her graduates. The conference attendee audience really could not fathom how a CIO would invest in technology that would actually advance their academic mission. This was flattering for me but what I took away from interacting with these professors was far more interesting. I sensed that most of the academics were just glad to have a job and teaching SAP ERP was a dependable niche. Many were at the conference hoping to discover options for how to get their research publication selected by an accredited journal with the inevitable goal of achieving tenure.  And most seemed to be very frustrated with the lack of support they receive from their institution.

There were a few shining stars at the conference though, such as Robert Léger at HEC Montreal who helped develop and now champions the use of the ERPsim simulation or Bret Wagner at Western Michigan, another ERPsim contributor who is developing improved algorithms. This was encouraging to see this commitment to giving students an education that directly translates into real life jobs. However, the stars had to buck the academy in pursuit of this more effective teaching strategy. You see, developing this real life business simulation gains very little credit toward promotion and tenure. What I loved was that this didn’t really matter. They were way beyond that lunacy.

There is change in the air but Higher Ed is not behind it. The underlying stimulus for building a curriculum of these useful business skills is coming from the private sector. Obviously SAP has a vested interest, but they have to balance their commitment. SAP still wants to make a profit off their professional training but expanding awareness of their product justifies their support of the higher education ERP program support. It is the consulting companies who are beginning to supply the fuel to this development.

We have been working with a group from Deloitte who are doing their own research on enhancing their student recruiting strategy. PWC was at the conference and I’m sure the other firms are aware of the value of hiring a more experienced work force from higher ed. I know that the graduates who have been fortunate enough to acquire this hands on ERP knowledge are being well compensated. So why isn’t higher education catering to this demand? Because this model does not fit into their academy. And it is the pressure to adapt to the academy which is generating the greatest stress among the professors involved with the SAP Academic Alliance. They need to get published.

I don’t have the time or the stomach to debate the current state of the promotion and tenure process of higher education, but it is broken. I just applaud the professors out there who have abandoned their concern for the process and are actively working on improving their teaching deliverables.